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Delve Deeper

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Dick Hollman Mail Scam





I know this is a little different from what I normally blog about but thought it should be seen by everyone. These scans are all the pages from this letter I got today in the mail. Clearly it's a scam (an old one, even far back as 2004.) I just wanted everyone to see it.
I have no idea where they got my name and address. I'm considering contacting someone high up in the US Postal Service about this. Think anything will get done?

I was researching this "Dick Hollman" online and found lots of blogs talking about this. Much of it is complete BS, with comments about how it works and how great it is. BUNK! (If you're one of those people associated with this scam-- DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT POSTING A COMMENT HERE BECAUSE IT WILL NEVER SEE THE LIGHT OF DAY!)

There can be no reasonable doubt that the "Dick Hollman" testimonial is a fictional rewrite of an earlier "Dave Rhodes" testimonial (also fictional). An early example of this Dave (or David) Rhodes testimonial appears in a 1986 money chain letter (Rhodes). Consider that these letters claim Rhodes and Hollman BOTH:
(1) were laid off and their unemployment insurance had run out
(2) used these exact words to describe their plight: "The bill collectors were hounding me like you wouldn't believe"
(3) lost cars; Rhodes to repossession (in 1983), Hollman to both repossession (in 1983, see 2005) and theft in 2003,
(4) made fortunes with a chain letter
(5) went on 10-day cruises with their family
(6) bought a Cadillac
(7) built a second home in Virginia.

Finally, consider the claim in this "Oprah" chain letter that an unnamed attorney made $968,493 and $2,344,178 using the letter. That requires a total of 3,111,671 letters received, each containing one dollar. An empty envelope and a dollar bill weight about .15 ounce. A little multiplication then reveals that this attorney would have to have received about 14.5 tons of mail. If it takes just 10 seconds to remove the bill from an envelope, it would take one person working without a break about a year just to remove the bills. And if each of these 3,111,671 participants themselves sent out 200 letters as instructed, a total of 622,334,200 letters must have been mailed. That makes two for every man, woman and child in the United States. I suppose this could happen (something like this did happen in 1935). But if so, I do not think one should expect to make any more money with the same letter. Daniel W. VanArsdale, March 10, 2009 {SOURCE}
Good point!

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